tennants-hair:

when i find myself in times of trouble

the 12th doctor comes to me

speaking words of wisdom

image

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VIA: doctorwho ORIGINALLY FROM: tennants-hair
Doctor Who    Twelve    

samsteves:

treat yo self. watch cap 2 again. watch cap 2 every day. who the fuck cares

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VIA: doctorroseandalltimelow ORIGINALLY FROM: samsteves
Captain America Winter Soldier    about me    
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VIA: profoundbandit ORIGINALLY FROM: j-boge
Subway    

glmrk-lls:

when I see lbs I don’t say pounds in my head I say libs

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VIA: vanilllabear ORIGINALLY FROM: glmrk-lls
lbs    

thequeerclone:

the fact that there are no leaked nudes in my dashboard proves that i’m following the right people

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VIA: kendallgrayson ORIGINALLY FROM: thequeerclone
yep    
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VIA: kendallgrayson ORIGINALLY FROM: quitespecial
Harry Styles    Michael Sam    

dimpleforyourthoughts:

msgryz:

the-cellist-in-portland:

Did you know: Chris Evans gets panic attacks. Yes, he does. This is one reason why he’s very private and didn’t really do any meet-and-greets on the Avengers’ sets.

It amazes and inspired me that a man who does what he does can do it, even with an anxiety disorder. You go, Chris.

This is why I get so upset when I hear negative comments about Chris and how he doesn’t seem as out-going as the rest of the Avengers cast. I remember hearing people complain about how he’s ‘rude’ and the like and it’s sad, because I highly doubt he intends to come off that way, he’s just more reserved than the others.

I remember hearing once that he actually went to seek psychiatric help before accepting the role of Captain America because of how anxious he felt regarding it. As well as the fact that he already played another Marvel superhero and he was concerned how comic fans would react to his playing another hero in that universe.

Just because someone’s in the entertainment industry doesn’t mean they’re going to be incredibly outgoing off camera just as much as they appear to be on camera. Some people just really enjoy acting; they’re not the characters they portray nor are they like their costars nor are they going to be incredibly outgoing because of their choice of career.

In all honesty, Chris’ openness about his anxiety is one of the most important things about him. You take a man who looks like Chris, and who is as successful as Chris, and that he is so frank about the fact that he has anxiety. This man, this wonderful man, destroys the idea that only certain people with certain lifestyles have anxiety, he destroys the notion that you are not allowed to seek help if you are in a position of privlege. And that he does so so gracefully and earnestly, is SO IMPORTANT. When was the last time a huge A-lister came out and admitted to having anxiety? Admitting to their own insecurities being so strong they needed to seek therapy? Chris Evans is not just a good looking talented guy, he is a confirmation that it’s okay to have anxiety, that all people—even the ones who look like they have everything—can experience this kind of thing. And that message is reaching hundreds of thousands of fans, including kids who are going to grow up with anxiety. Chris Evans is SO IMPORTANT YOU GUYS.

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VIA: sovietspyder ORIGINALLY FROM: ohyeahcevans
Chris Evans    Anxiety    
fuckyeahvintage-retro:

New York City, 1971

fuckyeahvintage-retro:

New York City, 1971

New York City    1971    1970s    

vacilandoelmundo:

Time Slice by Richard Silver

The idea behind the “Time Sliced” Project was to photograph iconic world buildings at sunset and capture the changing light from day to night in a single image. Experimenting with a few different kinds of processes I came up with the “Sliced” idea. I decided to Slice time and light showing the progression of the day from left to right.

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VIA: vananaz ORIGINALLY FROM: Flickr / rjsnyc
World    
theblacksophisticate:

atane:

zuky:

nezua:

Flappers shaming Miley Cyrus.

Oddly enough we could say that Miley Cyrus is following solidly in the appropriative footsteps of white flappers, who in the 1920s grabbed national attention and stirred alarmism concerning the end of civilization because they partied to Black music, wore their hair short like Josephine Baker (who fled US racism to become a superstar in Europe), and imitated dance moves from Baker and other Black dancers. The famously flapperesque Charleston was lifted from the African American dance called the Juba, which had West African roots and was danced in secret in the South and the Caribbean. The dance sped up when it reached Harlem, giving birth to both tap dancing and the Broadway hit called The Charleston, which spread like wildfire from there. White people didn’t sway their hips this scandalously prior to that era, making flappers roughly equivalent to white twerkers of the Jazz Age.

This is 100% true. The period from the jazz age to the beat generation, comparatively speaking was the height of cultural appropriation of black art. The beat generation used lingo popularized by Lester Young. They then appropriated the style, dress, and lingo of bebop musicians like Charlie Parker and Dizzy Gillespie, down to the beret, glasses, and soul patch. Bebop musicians, Parker and Gillespie in particular, were the blueprint of their image. Norman Mailer wrote an essay titled “The White Negro" that tackles this phenomenon. I’m no fan of Norman Mailer, but at least he admitted that white people were stealing from blacks. He wrote it in 1957.
With regards to the flappers, apart from Josephine Baker, they also liberally borrowed from black vaudeville performers. They would copy dance moves from black performers, and then introduce it as their own. Many dances attributed to whites are from black vaudeville performers who were forced to perform on the chitlin’ circuit because of segregation and Jim Crow laws.
It really is astonishing how nothing has changed in this regard. For example, people to this day still call Benny Goodman “the king of swing”, when what he did was procure charts for arrangements from Fletcher Henderson, a black man. Goodman’s biggest hits were from Henderson. It’s amazing how much credit Goodman gets for another man’s work. Of course Goodman became “the king of swing”, while Fletcher Henderson remains a footnote in history. How a white man becomes the king of something innovated by blacks is astounding. Benny Goodman is called “the king of swing”. Paul Whiteman is called “the king of jazz”. Elvis Presley is called “the king of rock n roll”. Is Eminem the king of rap? What about Justin Timberlake and Robin Thicke with r&b? Miley is soon on her way to become “the queen of twerking”.
Anyway, apart from getting his charts from Fletcher Henderson, Benny Goodman got his ass handed to him by Chick Webb at the Savoy Ballroom when they had a battle of the bands. Goodman is often noted as being one of the few white men in the segregation era to have black men in his band, and the narrative is typically presented as if he did it out of benevolence. He did it because there was no way to get around the fact that swing music was the domain of black folks, and he poached the best black players he could find to bolster his band, and black musicians went with him because as a white man, he was able to pay them more than black bandleaders, and they wouldn’t have to deal with indignity while traveling. Many hotels refused black bands, so they often had to sleep in cars, bus terminals, or crash at the homes of hospitable blacks. A big portion of Duke Ellington’s money went towards renting out train cars and making sure his orchestra had a place to sleep while on the road because hotels often turned them down because they were black. These were issues Goodman wasn’t going to face. Black musicians certainly didn’t go with him because he was the best. Goodman even later hired Henderson to arrange and play in his band. He wasn’t doing it because he loved black people. Black people were the ones creating and innovating. Where else would he get the best charts and arrangements? Now that the smoke has cleared and the dust has settled, Goodman gets all the credit. Funny how that works.
This stuff has been going on for a long time. Miley is the 2013 version. Twerking has been around for a long time, but Miley convulses on national tv and all of a sudden, dictionary definitions of twerking are made. Definitions complete with no mention of black people, like all this happened in a vacuum. It’s history repeating itself over and over again. I see the same thing happening with afrobeat music.

The more you know.

theblacksophisticate:

atane:

zuky:

nezua:

Flappers shaming Miley Cyrus.

Oddly enough we could say that Miley Cyrus is following solidly in the appropriative footsteps of white flappers, who in the 1920s grabbed national attention and stirred alarmism concerning the end of civilization because they partied to Black music, wore their hair short like Josephine Baker (who fled US racism to become a superstar in Europe), and imitated dance moves from Baker and other Black dancers. The famously flapperesque Charleston was lifted from the African American dance called the Juba, which had West African roots and was danced in secret in the South and the Caribbean. The dance sped up when it reached Harlem, giving birth to both tap dancing and the Broadway hit called The Charleston, which spread like wildfire from there. White people didn’t sway their hips this scandalously prior to that era, making flappers roughly equivalent to white twerkers of the Jazz Age.

This is 100% true. The period from the jazz age to the beat generation, comparatively speaking was the height of cultural appropriation of black art. The beat generation used lingo popularized by Lester Young. They then appropriated the style, dress, and lingo of bebop musicians like Charlie Parker and Dizzy Gillespie, down to the beret, glasses, and soul patch. Bebop musicians, Parker and Gillespie in particular, were the blueprint of their image. Norman Mailer wrote an essay titled “The White Negro" that tackles this phenomenon. I’m no fan of Norman Mailer, but at least he admitted that white people were stealing from blacks. He wrote it in 1957.

With regards to the flappers, apart from Josephine Baker, they also liberally borrowed from black vaudeville performers. They would copy dance moves from black performers, and then introduce it as their own. Many dances attributed to whites are from black vaudeville performers who were forced to perform on the chitlin’ circuit because of segregation and Jim Crow laws.

It really is astonishing how nothing has changed in this regard. For example, people to this day still call Benny Goodman “the king of swing”, when what he did was procure charts for arrangements from Fletcher Henderson, a black man. Goodman’s biggest hits were from Henderson. It’s amazing how much credit Goodman gets for another man’s work. Of course Goodman became “the king of swing”, while Fletcher Henderson remains a footnote in history. How a white man becomes the king of something innovated by blacks is astounding. Benny Goodman is called “the king of swing”. Paul Whiteman is called “the king of jazz”. Elvis Presley is called “the king of rock n roll”. Is Eminem the king of rap? What about Justin Timberlake and Robin Thicke with r&b? Miley is soon on her way to become “the queen of twerking”.

Anyway, apart from getting his charts from Fletcher Henderson, Benny Goodman got his ass handed to him by Chick Webb at the Savoy Ballroom when they had a battle of the bands. Goodman is often noted as being one of the few white men in the segregation era to have black men in his band, and the narrative is typically presented as if he did it out of benevolence. He did it because there was no way to get around the fact that swing music was the domain of black folks, and he poached the best black players he could find to bolster his band, and black musicians went with him because as a white man, he was able to pay them more than black bandleaders, and they wouldn’t have to deal with indignity while traveling. Many hotels refused black bands, so they often had to sleep in cars, bus terminals, or crash at the homes of hospitable blacks. A big portion of Duke Ellington’s money went towards renting out train cars and making sure his orchestra had a place to sleep while on the road because hotels often turned them down because they were black. These were issues Goodman wasn’t going to face. Black musicians certainly didn’t go with him because he was the best. Goodman even later hired Henderson to arrange and play in his band. He wasn’t doing it because he loved black people. Black people were the ones creating and innovating. Where else would he get the best charts and arrangements? Now that the smoke has cleared and the dust has settled, Goodman gets all the credit. Funny how that works.

This stuff has been going on for a long time. Miley is the 2013 version. Twerking has been around for a long time, but Miley convulses on national tv and all of a sudden, dictionary definitions of twerking are made. Definitions complete with no mention of black people, like all this happened in a vacuum. It’s history repeating itself over and over again. I see the same thing happening with afrobeat music.

The more you know.

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VIA: acceber74 ORIGINALLY FROM: melanskyyworld
cultural appropriation    History    

I think sometimes people are scared of the critique. I get it - it’s terrifying when images go online within half an hour. But passing judgement on someone else is a reflection of your own insecurities. We all make mistakes. We all have a fashion faux pas, choose the wrong script, write the wrong song. But it’s only by taking chances and occasionally getting it wrong that we grow.

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VIA: claraoswallds ORIGINALLY FROM: nataliedormersource
natalie dormer    
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VIA: vananaz ORIGINALLY FROM: rjdee
food porn    

the-goddamazon:

invisiblelad:

Perpetual reblogging.

LOL so much was said with so few lines.

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VIA: bmoreprincess ORIGINALLY FROM: lazarus-fly-bi-nite
Racis    white privilege    

soyonscruels:

I’ve made a lot of mistakes in my life but at least I didn’t just give Steven Moffat an Emmy

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VIA: acceber74 ORIGINALLY FROM: soyonscruels
Emmys 2014    Moffat    

caravaggista:

Karl Brullov, The Last Day of Pompeii (1830 - 1833)

Heartbreak, unspeakable loss, disaster… 

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VIA: vananaz ORIGINALLY FROM: caravaggista
Art    Pompeii