ultrafacts:

Source For more facts follow Ultrafacts

ultrafacts:

Source For more facts follow Ultrafacts

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VIA: randomsquirrel42 ORIGINALLY FROM: ultrafacts
History    WWII    

rosszkiejtes-roland:

1944. Normandia

forrás

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VIA: bmoreprincess ORIGINALLY FROM: szepkiejtes-rooland
1940s    1944    WWII    Normandy    France    
halfhardtorock:

lokisgift:

particularscarf:

bacon-radio:

historicaltimes:

Normandy landing that you didnt see. 1944

Red Cross workers.

That is seriously the most badass thing I’ve ever seen.

… i hate to feel like asking: this is for real right?

From the Red Cross page.

halfhardtorock:

lokisgift:

particularscarf:

bacon-radio:

historicaltimes:

Normandy landing that you didnt see. 1944

Red Cross workers.

That is seriously the most badass thing I’ve ever seen.

… i hate to feel like asking: this is for real right?

From the Red Cross page.

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VIA: deadpoolsmindpalace ORIGINALLY FROM: historicaltimes
WWII    1940s    1944    Red Cross    
did-you-kno:

Source

did-you-kno:

Source

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fact    WWII    

The Normandy landings(termed D-Daywere the landing operations of the Allied invasion during World War II, on the 6th of June 1944. The operation began the invasion of German-occupied western Europe and contributed to the ultimate Allied victory. It was among the most desperate undertakings in the history of war. Allied casualties on D-Day were at least 12,000, with 4,414 confirmed dead. German casualties were around 1,000 men.

On the eve of D-Day the Allied leadership was in a state of neurotic anxiety. Just after midnight, a restless Churchill bade his wife goodnight with the words, ‘Do you realise that by the time you wake up in the morning twenty thousand men may have been killed?’ (X)

I used footage from Band of Brothers to make this set. It is supposed to represent airborne troops, which were dropped to support the navy.

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VIA: cheeerry-bomb ORIGINALLY FROM: skyisawake
WWII    Band of Brothers    D-Day    

todayinhistory:

June 6th 1944: D-Day

On this day in 1944, the D-Day landings began on the beaches of Normandy as part of the Allied ‘Operation Overlord’. The largest amphibious military operation in history, the operation involved thousands of Allied troops landing in France. For those landing on the beaches of Normandy, they faced heavy fire, mines and other obstacles on the beach, but managed to push inland. In charge of the operation was future US President General Dwight Eisenhower and leading the ground forces was British General Bernard Montgomery. The landings proved a decisive Allied victory, as they secured a foothold in France which had been defeated by Nazi Germany in 1940. D-Day was a key moment in the Second World War and helped turn the tide of the war in favour of the Allies. 70 years on, we remember not just the strategic victory that was D-Day but also the ultimate sacrifice paid by thousands of soldiers on both sides of the fighting.

“You are about to embark upon the great crusade, toward which we have striven these many months.”
- Eisenhower’s message to the Allied Expeditionary Force

70 years ago today

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VIA: critter4lyfe ORIGINALLY FROM: todayinhistory
WWII    History    D-Day    
did-you-kno:

Source

did-you-kno:

Source

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fact    WWII    history    
did-you-kno:

Source

did-you-kno:

Source

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fact    WWII    
Anonymous ASKED:
Hi there! So, I don't know much about the military and I was wondering if you knew how MCU Bucky would have gotten to the rank of sergeant so quickly? And if so, during battles, would he have been the only one in his army squad giving orders or would he be taking orders from anyone else?

weinersoldier:

During wartime, the US Army has been known to basically fast-track rank promotions, for several reasons - a pressing need for more ranking officers (an upswing in conscripted men creates a lot of demand, and the US Army swelled from 500,000 men before war was declared to nearly 12 million by the end of 1945 ) as well as a constant need to replace officers who are wounded, captured, or KIA.  Additionally, soldiers who showed aptitude for special skills, or had previous desirable training (especially doctors) tended to get promoted more quickly.

So, for someone like Bucky, who more than likely showed a particular aptitude as a sniper during basic training and was assigned to an Infantry division, promotion to Sergeant isn’t a huge stretch?  Sergeant is the second-lowest grade of non-commissioned officer, meaning he would’ve been promoted through the ranks from Private, and in an Infantry unit, Sergeants command four-man fireteams (there are two fireteams in a 9-man rifle squad, which is lead by a Staff Sergeant, one rank above Sergeant - so yes, Bucky’d be giving a few orders, but he’d still be subject to the chain of command, with his immediate CO being that Staff Sergeant).

Speaking to the time (and the fact that Bucky enlisted relatively early in the war, when conscription was just notching into high gear), his natural skill with a rifle would’ve made him an asset as a Sergeant, given that he could, at that rank, command his own fireteam.  And, in all-out wartime, having anyone who knows what they’re doing in charge of scared, young men who’ve been drafted is better than nothing.

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Bucky Barnes    WWII    military    Commentary    

"My cousin Helen, who is in her 90s now, was in the Warsaw ghetto during World War II. She and a bunch of the girls in the ghetto had to do sewing each day. And if you were found with a book, it was an automatic death penalty. She had gotten hold of a copy of ‘Gone With the Wind’, and she would take three or four hours out of her sleeping time each night to read. And then, during the hour or so when they were sewing the next day, she would tell them all the story. These girls were risking certain death for a story. And when she told me that story herself, it actually made what I do feel more important. Because giving people stories is not a luxury. It’s actually one of the things that you live and die for."  -  Neil Gaiman (via jaynestown)

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VIA: claraoswallds ORIGINALLY FROM: lupanthropy
Neil Gaiman    WWII    history    books    
absentlyabbie:

shinykari:

legete:

haipollai:

ok, idk how easy this is to read but since everyone is discussing dates, i went to the movie to check. this is steve’s rejection from the beginning, his birthday is in the upper right corner and there’s ANOTHEr date in the lower left which I think is supposed to be a today’s date kind of thing and it looks to be June 14 1943
so there we go, steve enlists in mid 1943

#this feels late for bucky to be enlisting #but that isn’t the issue
How interesting that you would mention this, because I’ve recently been thinking he didn’t enlist. His serial number, which he’s heard muttering when Steve comes to rescue him, starts “32557.”
According to this fabulous WWII serial number generator, an enlisted man from New York should have a serial number starting with the numbers “12.”
A New York man with a serial number starting with “32”? Drafted. What we may be dealing with here is a Bucky who didn’t choose to go to war but was instead compelled to do so versus a Steve who is desperate to get in. I think it opens up a lot of different and interesting storylines for the two of them.

There’s been some great meta/discussion about this in the last couple days, which I think is great.

Makes you wonder if Bucky got the draft, and then, knowing how Steve felt about things, told his best buddy he was “enlisting.” Because how do you face this skinny, brave idiot who just won’t stop trying to volunteer that you wouldn’t be going if you didn’t have to?

I just need to jump in here and say that June 14 is my birthday so that just makes me really fucking happy.
But also, if Bucky was drafted, wouldn’t he be a Private or a PFC rather than a Sergeant?http://www.fatherswar.com/8thinfdiv/WW2/ww2_8thgeneralinfo/general%20info/WW2%20Rank.html

absentlyabbie:

shinykari:

legete:

haipollai:

ok, idk how easy this is to read but since everyone is discussing dates, i went to the movie to check. this is steve’s rejection from the beginning, his birthday is in the upper right corner and there’s ANOTHEr date in the lower left which I think is supposed to be a today’s date kind of thing and it looks to be June 14 1943

so there we go, steve enlists in mid 1943

#this feels late for bucky to be enlisting #but that isn’t the issue

How interesting that you would mention this, because I’ve recently been thinking he didn’t enlist. His serial number, which he’s heard muttering when Steve comes to rescue him, starts “32557.”

According to this fabulous WWII serial number generator, an enlisted man from New York should have a serial number starting with the numbers “12.”

A New York man with a serial number starting with “32”? Drafted. What we may be dealing with here is a Bucky who didn’t choose to go to war but was instead compelled to do so versus a Steve who is desperate to get in. I think it opens up a lot of different and interesting storylines for the two of them.

There’s been some great meta/discussion about this in the last couple days, which I think is great.

Makes you wonder if Bucky got the draft, and then, knowing how Steve felt about things, told his best buddy he was “enlisting.” Because how do you face this skinny, brave idiot who just won’t stop trying to volunteer that you wouldn’t be going if you didn’t have to?

I just need to jump in here and say that June 14 is my birthday so that just makes me really fucking happy.

But also, if Bucky was drafted, wouldn’t he be a Private or a PFC rather than a Sergeant?
http://www.fatherswar.com/8thinfdiv/WW2/ww2_8thgeneralinfo/general%20info/WW2%20Rank.html

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VIA: stankface ORIGINALLY FROM: haipollai
Captain America The First Avenger    personal    Steve Rogers    Bucky Barnes    WWII    Commentary    
nativeamericannews:

Edmond A. Harjo, Code Talker from Seminole Nation, passes away
Edmond Andrew Harjo, a member of the Seminole Nation who served as a Code Talker during World War II, died this morning.Harjo and his fellow Seminole soldiers — including his brothers — used their language to transmit unbreakable codes. The late veteran was recognized for his service by Congress last year.

nativeamericannews:

Edmond A. Harjo, Code Talker from Seminole Nation, passes away

Edmond Andrew Harjo, a member of the Seminole Nation who served as a Code Talker during World War II, died this morning.
Harjo and his fellow Seminole soldiers — including his brothers — used their language to transmit unbreakable codes. The late veteran was recognized for his service by Congress last year.

WWII    history    Native American    
uwot-me-m8:

1945 - Berlin, after the Soviet attack. 

uwot-me-m8:

1945 - Berlin, after the Soviet attack. 

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Reichstag    1945    Berling    Germany    WWII    1940s    
magictransistor:

Man reads a newspaper on New York’s 6th Ave. and 40th St, with the 'headline' reading: “Nazi Army Now 75 Miles From Paris.” (May 18, 1940)

magictransistor:

Man reads a newspaper on New York’s 6th Ave. and 40th St, with the 'headline' reading: “Nazi Army Now 75 Miles From Paris.” (May 18, 1940)

New York City    1940s    1940    WWII    

thevintagethimble:

WWII Hairstyles
A collection of WWII photographs, depicting some Of the hairstyles of the time, like the victory Rolls, the lifted and the swoops hairstyles. Most of these woman pictured here, were either in the services, the Land Army, WVS, working in factories or part of the home front. A rather inspiring gaggle of girls with gorgeous locks.

Victorian Hairstyles Here [x] | Edwardian Hairstyles Here [x] | 1920’s Hairstyles Here [x] | 1930’s Hairstyles Here [x]

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VIA: wishingwhale ORIGINALLY FROM: thevintagethimble
WWII    history    hairstyles