You're My Mission

I'm Alycia. Christian. ENFJ. History and movie encyclopedia. Born in Michigan on 14 June, raised in Colorado.

Foreign language films. I will watch anything but my favorites tend to be German and Scandinavian films.

I tag things obsessively so it's usually pretty easy to dig through my shit.

The Merlin to my Arthur
The Bucky to my Steve
The Niki Lauda to my James Hunt
The Rose to my Doctor
The Blair to my Chuck

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Posts tagged "WWII"

absentlyabbie:

shinykari:

legete:

haipollai:

ok, idk how easy this is to read but since everyone is discussing dates, i went to the movie to check. this is steve’s rejection from the beginning, his birthday is in the upper right corner and there’s ANOTHEr date in the lower left which I think is supposed to be a today’s date kind of thing and it looks to be June 14 1943

so there we go, steve enlists in mid 1943

#this feels late for bucky to be enlisting #but that isn’t the issue

How interesting that you would mention this, because I’ve recently been thinking he didn’t enlist. His serial number, which he’s heard muttering when Steve comes to rescue him, starts “32557.”

According to this fabulous WWII serial number generator, an enlisted man from New York should have a serial number starting with the numbers “12.”

A New York man with a serial number starting with “32”? Drafted. What we may be dealing with here is a Bucky who didn’t choose to go to war but was instead compelled to do so versus a Steve who is desperate to get in. I think it opens up a lot of different and interesting storylines for the two of them.

There’s been some great meta/discussion about this in the last couple days, which I think is great.

Makes you wonder if Bucky got the draft, and then, knowing how Steve felt about things, told his best buddy he was “enlisting.” Because how do you face this skinny, brave idiot who just won’t stop trying to volunteer that you wouldn’t be going if you didn’t have to?

I just need to jump in here and say that June 14 is my birthday so that just makes me really fucking happy.

But also, if Bucky was drafted, wouldn’t he be a Private or a PFC rather than a Sergeant?
http://www.fatherswar.com/8thinfdiv/WW2/ww2_8thgeneralinfo/general%20info/WW2%20Rank.html

(via stankface)

nativeamericannews:

Edmond A. Harjo, Code Talker from Seminole Nation, passes away

Edmond Andrew Harjo, a member of the Seminole Nation who served as a Code Talker during World War II, died this morning.
Harjo and his fellow Seminole soldiers — including his brothers — used their language to transmit unbreakable codes. The late veteran was recognized for his service by Congress last year.

uwot-me-m8:

1945 - Berlin, after the Soviet attack. 

magictransistor:

Man reads a newspaper on New York’s 6th Ave. and 40th St, with the 'headline' reading: “Nazi Army Now 75 Miles From Paris.” (May 18, 1940)

(via gregorypecks-deactivated2014032)

thevintagethimble:

WWII Hairstyles
A collection of WWII photographs, depicting some Of the hairstyles of the time, like the victory Rolls, the lifted and the swoops hairstyles. Most of these woman pictured here, were either in the services, the Land Army, WVS, working in factories or part of the home front. A rather inspiring gaggle of girls with gorgeous locks.

Victorian Hairstyles Here [x] | Edwardian Hairstyles Here [x] | 1920’s Hairstyles Here [x] | 1930’s Hairstyles Here [x]

(via wishingwhale)

historicaltimes:

Drawn/painted on nylon stockings became a great fashion when nylon was used for the war effort, 1942

chl59:

More images here and here. Also if you want to read more click here

(via kittycanary-deactivated20140131)

philliciaglee:

parasiteprogram:

richwhitelesbian:

exanimatio:

croowley:

That man you see there, he is a 92 year old veteran from Norway, who was tortured by the nazis during world war II. 
The upper picture is the picture of the “BOY London” logo, that’s so popular now days.
Then, on the picture under, is a known symbol that were used under by the nazis in World War II. 
Now you can all think of what you’re really wearing.

finally someone made a post about it, everyone’s running around with the Third Reich Eagle on their chests

(via acceber74)

chairsexual:

screamsflailsdiesetc:

harrypotterwhovian:

forgetful-thoughts:

did-you-kno:

Source

THIS IS THE CUTEST SHIT EVER I SHIP IT

and norway sends a freaking huge christmas tree to london (X)

image

do I seriously ship two countries together

yes

yes i do

is that you hetalia

(via ophelialondon)


Okinawan boy wanders into American lines…
this is the result…..Marines share their foxhole……how beautiful and inspiring
July 1945

Okinawan boy wanders into American lines…

this is the result…..Marines share their foxhole……how beautiful and inspiring

July 1945

(via raphmike)

fyeah-history:

Roza Shanina in November 1944, wearing a male-issue wool field shirt and woollen skirt. The shirt was khaki, while the skirt was dark blue
Roza Georgiyevna Shanina (3 April 1924 – 28 January 1945) was a Soviet sniper during World War II, credited with fifty-four confirmed hits, including twelve soldiers during the Battle of Vilnius. Praised for her shooting accuracy, Shanina was capable of precisely hitting moving enemy personnel and making doublets (two target hits by two rounds fired in quick succession). She volunteered to serve as a marksman on the front line.

fuckyeahhistorycrushes:

This here ladies and gentlemen is Flight Officer Johnny Smythe.  He is one fine man!
On his 28th bomber mission, in November 1943, he was wounded, shot down, and captured by Germans who could not believe they were looking at a Black officer. In Stalag Luft One, Smythe worked on the escape committee, but couldn’t break out himself: “I don’t think a six-foot-five black man would’ve got very far in Pomerania.”

fuckyeahhistorycrushes:

This here ladies and gentlemen is Flight Officer Johnny Smythe.  He is one fine man!

On his 28th bomber mission, in November 1943, he was wounded, shot down, and captured by Germans who could not believe they were looking at a Black officer. In Stalag Luft One, Smythe worked on the escape committee, but couldn’t break out himself: “I don’t think a six-foot-five black man would’ve got very far in Pomerania.”

(via stankface)

simbartez:

Tuskegee Airmen

The Tuskegee Airman were an elite group of African-American pilots in the 1940s. They were pioneers in equality and integration of the Armed Forces. The term  ”Tuskegee Airmen” refers to all who were involved in the Army Air Corps program to train African Americans to fly and maintain combat aircraft. The Tuskegee Airmen included pilots, navigators, bombardiers, maintenance and support staff, instructors, and all the personnel who kept the planes in the air. 

The primary flight training for these service members took place at the Division of Aeronautics of Tuskegee Institute. Air Corps officials built a separate facility at Tuskegee Army Air Field to train the pilots. The Tuskegee Airmen not only battled enemies during wartime but also fought against racism and segregation thus proving they were just as good as any other pilot.  Racism was common during World War II and many people did not want blacks to become pilots. They trained in overcrowded classrooms and airstrips, and suffered from the racist attitude of some military officials. The Tuskegee Airman suffered many hardships, but they proved themselves to be world class pilots.

Even though the Tuskegee Airmen proved their worth as military pilots they were still forced to operate in segregated units and did not fight alongside their white countrymen. 

The men earned the nickname “Red Tail Angels” since the bombers considered their escorts  ”angels” and the red paint on the propeller and tail of their planes.  

By the end of the war, 992 men had graduated from Negro Air Corps pilot training at Tuskegee; 450 were sent overseas for combat assignment. During the same period, about 150 lost their lives while in training or on combat flights. These black Airmen manage to destroy or damage over 409 German airplanes, 950 ground units, and sank a battleship destroyer. They ran more than 200 bomber escort missions during World War II. 

Despite their distinguished wartime record, the Tuskegee Airmen returned to an America unwilling to recognize their contributions. They were still made to stay on the ships that brought them home from war until their white counterparts had disembarked. They experienced local governments treating German  POWs better than they were treated.

(via spyderdoll)

fyeah-history:

In the women’s camp at Mauthausen, survivors stand around the entrance to a barracks, 1945

fyeah-history:

World War II pin honouring Pearl Harbour hero 
Doris “Dorie” Miller (October 12, 1919 – November 24, 1943) was a cook in the United States Navy noted for his bravery during the attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. He was the first African American to be awarded the Navy Cross, the third highest honor awarded by the U.S. Navy at the time, after the Medal of Honor and the Navy Distinguished Service Medal (today the Navy Cross precedes the Navy Distinguished Service Medal). Miller took over a machine gun aboard the USS West Virginia and was officially credited with downing two Japanese planes. He was honored as one of the first heroes of World War II, and six months after the attack was given the Navy Cross by Admiral Chester Nimitz.